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Srinivasa Ramanujan Birthday | Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography | Biography Srinivasa Ramanujan | Birthday Srinivasa Ramanujan

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 Srinivasa Ramanujan Birthday | Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography | Srinivasa Ramanujan

Srinivasa Ramanujan Birthday :December 22nd would have been the 129th birthday of the legendary Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan, who recently achieved wider fame through the film The man who knew infinity. His story really is remarkable. Born in 1887 in a small village around 400km from Madras (now Chennai), Ramanujan developed a passion for maths very early on.

Srinivasa Ramanujan Birthday, Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography, Biography Srinivasa Ramanujan, Birthday Srinivasa Ramanujan, Ramanujan Biography, Ramanujan Birthday
Srinivasa Ramanujan Birthday

 Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography in English

Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography  :By age 15 he routinely solved maths problems that went way beyond what his classmates were dealing with. He worked out his own method for solving quartic equations, for example, and even had a go at quintic ones (and failed of course, since the general quintic is unsolvable). But since he neglected all other subjects apart from maths, Ramanujan never got into university, and was forced to continue studying maths alone and in poverty. Only after a plea to an eminent mathematician, who described Ramanujan as “A short uncouth figure, stout, unshaven, not over clean,” did Ramanujan eventually get a job as a clerk at the Madras Port Trust.

 About Srinivasa Ramanujan in English

 It was amid his time at the Port Trust that Ramanujan chose to compose a letter that was to transform him. It was routed to the well known Cambridge number scholar G. H. Solid who, acquainted with this mid twentieth-century type of spam, was chafed at initial: a letter from an obscure Indian containing insane looking hypotheses and no evidences by any stretch of the imagination. However, as he approached his day, Hardy couldn’t exactly disregard the content:

Birthday Srinivasa Ramanujan |At the back of his psyche […] the Indian composition pestered away. Wild hypotheses. Hypotheses, for example, he had never observed, nor envisioned. An extortion of virtuoso? An inquiry was framing itself in his brain. As it was Hardy’s psyche, the inquiry was framing itself with epigrammatic clearness: is an extortion of virtuoso more plausible than an obscure mathematician of virtuoso? Plainly the appropriate response was no. Back in his rooms in Trinity, he had another take a gander at the content. He reached out to Littlewood that they should have an exchange after lobby…

Srinivasa Ramanujan in English Biography

Evidently it didn’t take them long. Before midnight they knew, and knew for certain. The essayist of these compositions was a man of virtuoso. 

Srinivasa Ramanujan Birthday, Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography, Biography Srinivasa Ramanujan, Birthday Srinivasa Ramanujan, Ramanujan Biography, Ramanujan Birthday
Srinivasa Ramanujan Biography

From the foreword by C. P. Snow to Hardy’s A Mathematician’s Apology

Birthday Srinivasa Ramanujan :
Strong welcomed Ramanujan to Cambridge, and on March 17, 1914 Ramanujan set sail for England to begin a standout amongst the most interesting joint efforts ever of. Appropriate from the begin the match created critical outcomes and Ramanujan compensated for the holes in his formal maths instruction by taking a degree in Cambridge. Maybe the most celebrated story to rise up out of this period has Hardy visiting Ramanujan as he lay sick in bed. Solid whined that the quantity of the taxi he had landed in, 1729, was an exhausting number, and that he stressed this was a terrible sign. “No,” Ramanujan answered, clearly decisively. “It is an exceptionally fascinating number; it is the most modest number expressible as the entirety of two solid shapes in two diverse ways”:

[ 1729 = 1^3 + 12^3 = 9^3 + 10^3. ]

Sadly, Ramanujan‘s ailment was certifiably not a unique case. His wellbeing had dependably been weak, and the cool climate and unaccustomed English sustenance didn’t help. Ramanujan chose to come back to India in 1919 and passed on the next year, matured just 33. He is as yet celebrated as one of India’s most noteworthy mathematicians.

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